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CIA chief Brennan warns of Istanbul-style attacks in US

DAILY SABAH
ISTANBUL
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Bullet impacts are pictured at Ataturk airport's International airport on June 29, 2016, a day after a suicide bombing and gun attack targeted Istanbul's airport, killing at least 36 people. (AFP PHoto)
Bullet impacts are pictured at Ataturk airport's International airport on June 29, 2016, a day after a suicide bombing and gun attack targeted Istanbul's airport, killing at least 36 people. (AFP PHoto)

CIA Director John Brennan Wednesday said that signs show that triple terror attacks at Istanbul Atatürk Airport was likely to be carried out by Daesh and warned that the group might be planning to conduct similar large-scale attacks in the United States.

"You look at what happened in the Turkish airport, these were suicide vests. It's not that difficult to actually construct and fabricate a suicide vest … so if you have a determined enemy and individuals who are not concerned about escape, that they are going into it with a sense that they are going to die, that really does complicate your strategy in terms of preventing attacks," Brennan said in an exclusive interview at CIA headquarters with Yahoo News.

Brennan continued: "I would be surprised if Daesh is not trying to carry out that kind of attack in the United States."

"I am worried from the standpoint of an intelligence professional who looks at the capabilities of Daesh … and their determination to kill as many as people as possible and to carry out attacks abroad," he said.

Brennan later indicated that the method of attack — suicide bombers wearing explosives-laden vests — pointed to the Daesh terrorists. "It was a suicide bombing [which] is usually more a Daesh technique," Brennan said.

Touching upon the Syrian civil war and the war against Daesh, Brennan said that the war "is not going to be resolved on the battlefield."

Three suicide attackers killed 43 people, including 19 foreigners, at the airport, Turkish officials said on Thursday.

The airport was shut for several hours after the brutal attack. Planes had begun landing just before dawn, and the first departures took off in the morning hours, as the airport resumed operations.

Turkey declared Wednesday a day of national mourning over the attack while the government has ordered flags at half-staff.

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