Israeli media covers reconciliation deal as diplomatic victory for Turkey

DAILY SABAH
ISTANBUL
Published 27.06.2016 17:57
Updated 28.06.2016 00:30
An Algerian fan waves a Palestinian flag as he shows his support during a friendly match between the Palestinian and Algerian Olympic football teams at the du 5 Juillet 1962 stadium in Algiers.
An Algerian fan waves a Palestinian flag as he shows his support during a friendly match between the Palestinian and Algerian Olympic football teams at the du 5 Juillet 1962 stadium in Algiers.

The reconciliation deal reached between Turkey and Israel is seen as a diplomatic victory for Turkey in Israeli media outlets, with mixed reactions ranging from discontent to praise, emphasizing the benefits of the agreement for Turkey.

Hamas and Turkey come out as winners in the upcoming deal if reports in the Israeli media are correct, Ariel Ben Solomon wrote for Jerusalem Post, criticizing Israel for making compromises on Turkey's close relations with Hamas.

Israeli newspaper Haaretz said the agreement came six years late and claimed that Israel would have met the very same conditions right after Mavi Marmara raid.

"Turkey does not need Israel as much as it needed in the past, it was a necessary deal." Haaretz reported.

Gilad Sharon, the son of former PM Ariel Sharon, wrote on Ynetnews that Erdoğan has set national dignity as his top priority in the agreement, saying Israel failed to do so.

"When someone apologizes and expresses their willingness to compensate the other party, it is only because they have acted inappropriately, unlawfully, or unjustly. And so, I would appreciate it if the Cabinet were to explain what exactly we are apologizing for." Sharon wrote.

Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım has announced on Monday the details of the reconciliation deal ending a six-year rift over the Israeli navy's killing of 10 Turkish pro-Palestinian activists who tried to sail to the blockaded Gaza Strip in 2010.Yıldırım confirmed that Israel has agreed to pay $20 million (18.14 million euros) in compensation to the families of 2010 Mavi Marmara raid victims.

Under the deal, Turkey will deliver humanitarian aid and other non-military products to Gaza and a first shipment of 10,000 tons of aid would be sent next Friday, Yıldırım [Office1] told reporters during a press conference in Ankara.

Turkey will also be allowed to deliver aid to Gaza in the future and invest in infrastructure projects under the deal, the prime minister said.

The deal will see the two countries exchange ambassadors "as soon as possible," Yıldırım said.

His Israeli counterpart, Benjamin Netanyahu, made a simultaneous announcement in Rome, saying the deal would help bring "stability" to the turbulent Middle East.

"The world is in turmoil. The Middle East is in turmoil. And my goal as prime minister is to create focus points of stability in this volatile and stormy region," Netanyahu said.

"We are two large powers in the region and the break between us didn't benefit either of our mutual interests," the Israeli prime minister said.

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