Turkey's daily power generation from wind plants hits record

ANADOLU AGENCY
ANKARA
Published 28.09.2018 00:05

Turkey's wind electricity generation hit a daily record Wednesday with around 16.8 percent of the total power being generated from wind.

The country produced 130.7 gigawatt-hours (GWh) of electricity from wind farms between 7 p.m. Tuesday and 7 p.m. Wednesday, according to data provided by the Turkish Energy Exchange (EPİAŞ).

During this particular time period, wind power was the third largest energy source after natural gas which generated 213.5 GWh of electricity and hard coal with 180.6 GWh.

Hydropower plants, kinetic energy from rivers, geothermal, biomass, fuel oil, solar, diesel and liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplied the remaining share of total production of 780.6 GWh.Throughout the period, wind power generation per hour remained above 5 GWh, standing at 5.45 GWh on average.

According to Turkey's Energy Market Regulatory Authority (EMRA), the country's total installed power capacity was 82 GW at the end of June. Wind power installed capacity was 6.64 GW over the same period.Turkey plans to boost its wind and solar capacity by 10,000 MW each in the coming decade through renewable energy resources zone (YEKA) tenders. The Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources will accept applications up to Oct. 23 for one of the biggest offshore wind plants in the world, which will have a total installed capacity of 1.2 GW. The ceiling price for 1 MWh in the reverse bid auction has been set at $8.

Part of the tender stipulates that the winning bidder will sign an energy purchase agreement with the ministry for the first 50 terawatt-hours of electricity production starting from the first commissioning of the plant.

The tender specifications require 60 percent local equipment production and call for 80 percent of the engineers employed to

be of Turkish origin. Saros and Gallipoli located in the Marmara region and Kıyıköy in Thrace were named as the candidate regions for the power plant in March.

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