Sex-selective abortion fears in India after no girls reported among 216 newborns

DAILY SABAH WITH WIRES
ISTANBUL
Published 23.07.2019 18:08
Workers with the Indian Red Cross Society hold abandoned baby boys found at a 'pangpura' (cradle) drop-off box at the entrance to the Red Cross House in Amritsar on June 9, 2015. (AFP Photo)
Workers with the Indian Red Cross Society hold abandoned baby boys found at a 'pangpura' (cradle) drop-off box at the entrance to the Red Cross House in Amritsar on June 9, 2015. (AFP Photo)

Indian authorities have launched a probe after it was revealed that there was not a single girl among the 216 babies born across dozens of villages in northern Indian districts in the last three months, raising concerns of sex-selective abortion.

According to the official birth records published in the Uttarkashi region in Uttarakhand province, there were no female babies from a total of 132 villages, which now have been labeled as "red areas" that will be probed further by officials, New Delhi-based ANI News Agency reported.

Ashish Chauhan, the district magistrate, said they "are monitoring these areas to find out what is affecting the ratio. A detailed survey and study will be conducted to identify the reason behind it," Chauchan was quoted by the agency.

Chauhan added that families who continue this practice of sex-selective abortion would face legal action.

Kalpana Thakur, an Indian social worker, told ANI News that the latest statistics from Uttarkashi district showed the authorities were not doing enough.

"No girls were born for three months in these villages. It cannot be just a coincidence. This clearly indicates female feticides are taking place in the district. The government and the administration are not doing anything," Thakur said.

India banned abortion against female fetuses in 1994, but according to news reports, the implementation continues because of some local traditions and practices that see female children as a burden to the family.

According to a government report released in 2018, about 63 million women in the country's population were 'missing'.

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