Riyadh's metrobus to be built by Turkish company

KERIM ÜLKER
ISTANBUL
Published 09.06.2015 22:33

The Turkish construction company Yüksel İnşaat has been chosen to build a rapid bus transit line in the Saudi capital of Riyadh for $614 million.

Widely known as the metrobus in Turkey, the bus rapid transit line, which has relieved Istanbul's heavy traffic to some extent, will be introduced to the Gulf region following the successful construction of a new line in Pakistan. The project will be one of Saudi Arabia's major infrastructure projects, as Saudi authorities attempt to address its increasingly worsening traffic problems that have recently escalated with the rise in car sales. This culminated in the decision to issue a tender to construct a metrobus line in Riyadh, which Yüksel İnşaat won. The company will fulfill the Riyadh Rapid Bus Transit System project for 2.29 billion Saudi Arabian riyals ($614 million). The project, which is awaiting final approval from the Ar-Riyadh Development Authority, will consist of 21 different units. Yüksel İnşaat General Manager Ahmet Halavuk, said the project will be a major constituent of the King Abdulaziz Transport System and will include seven overpasses. Some 4,500 workers will be employed in the construction of the metrobus line, which will run throughout Riyadh. The project is scheduled to be completed in May 2016. With its 6 million inhabitants, Riyadh is the most populated city of Saudi Arabia, which has a population of 30 million. The project's infrastructural work will be jointly undertaken by the University of Dammam.

The Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality designed the metrobus line that was constructed in Lahore, one of the biggest cities in Pakistan. The project was realized through a consultancy agreement with the Punjab provincial government in 2011, completed in 11 months and came into operation in 2012. The Lahore Metrobus Line carries 100,000 passengers per day. The operating rights of the 27-kilometer-line are undertaken by Turkish Albayrak Holding.

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