Egypt: The signal flare of new medieval times

Published 17.06.2015 23:53

Egypt is the most serious example of what was sewn into the region's countries for the new millennium. It is wished that all the region's countries draw lessons from what happened in Egypt

The figures below present the record of Egyptian democracy:1956 election: The winner is Gamal Abdel Nasser with 99.9 percent of vote.

1958 election: The winner is Gamal Abdel Nasser with 100 percent of vote.

1965 election:1970 election: The winner is Anwar Sadat with 90 percent of vote.

1976 election: The winner is Anwar Sadat with 99.94 percent of vote.

1981 election: The winner is Hosni Mubarak with 98.5 percent of vote.

1987 election: The winner is Hosni Mubarak with 97.1percent of vote.

1993 election: The winner is Hosni Mubarak with 96.3 percent of vote.

1999 election: The winner is Hosni Mubarak with 93.79 percent of vote.

2005 election: The winner is Hosni Mubarak with 88.6 percent of vote.

2012 election: The winner is Mohammed Morsi with 51.73 percent of vote.

2014 election: The winner is Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi with 96.91percent of vote.

Even without knowing anything about the political and economic condition of Egypt, one can easily detect the dictators from the other figures. So, what is the brief story of Morsi, the only person who disrupted the picture in this desperate list? At the very beginning of his rule, a large-scale campaign was kicked off against Morsi. The U.S. and Europe, who got along well with the dictators ruling Egypt for years with nearly 100 percent of vote, suddenly started to cry out the danger they read from coffee fortune-telling. According to them, Morsi could lead the fragile Egyptian democracy into an irreversible path and immediate measures should be taken.

With the international legitimacy it had, the Egyptian opposition occupied the streets to overthrow Morsi, whom they could not defeat in elections. Afterward, the army intervened. The Egyptians who poured into the streets to protect their will were murdered in squares. Eventually, with the election that was monitored by the West and in which opponents could not even make propaganda, the coup leader, Sissi, received 96.91 percent of vote just like the other Egyptian dictators. The West, which said Morsi was "inclined to being authoritarian" by fortune-telling, did not see any danger in Sissi's power, who became president by receiving nearly 100 percent of the vote after arresting elected politicians. As soon as he was elected, Sissi was recognized by the "contemporary" world and successive visits were paid to Cairo.

We have come to these days from such a past. The judicial authority controlled by Sissi, who attempted to completely eradicate the Egyptian democracy, which had conducted its first democratic elections for the first time in its history, condemned Morsi and his colleagues to death. The world is silent and the countries in the region are silent. Only Turkey raises its voice against this blatant unlawfulness. But why?

The reason is quite clear. For the West, the most inexcusable offense in the third world is to come to power by popular will. Morsi came to power by receiving a reasonable majority of votes in free general elections as can be seen in the figures above. The reason is that the governments that are formed by popular will act according to the economic and political interests of their countries by leaving behind the exploitation paradigm that has reigns in this region for a century. Thereby, the systematic chain of poverty in those countries is broken. Parallel to per capita income, the level of civilian politics and democracy increases, which subverts all the balances of the West, which flourished in the chaos of the New World.

This is the story of democracy in Egypt, which was stamped out at its very birth with the instruction and will of the West rather than its silence. The final aim of the Arab Spring deceit, with which they deluded most of us with the guise of internationalism, eventually came in sight.

Although we already knew it, we have come to see one more time that dictatorships do not pose a problem to the U.S. and Europe as long as the dictators are secular and are not disposed to considering popular will.

Secular ones will be replaced with the authoritarians whose thrones were shaken during the Arab Spring. Egypt is the most serious example of what was sewn into the region's countries for the new millennium. It is wished that all the region's countries draw lessons from what happened in Egypt. With upholding death penalties against Morsi and his colleagues, they want Cairo to be remembered as a "ville muudite"* by those who want to stand against the state of affairs by taking the support of democratic and popular will. But no one must forget that in those lands where true stories are read as myths life also develops plans for dictators and their co-conspirators. Unfortunately, it will be too late for all of us when the ones who are causing a storm in the third world understand that they will not safely live in their sterile cities forever.

*Ville maudite, the condemned city. Due to an offense committed socially, all the people in the city are deported, families are sent to other cities of the land one by one. The evacuated city is set on fire. To set an example to current and future generations, a large black stone is placed as a pillar on the government square.

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