Brexit pressure rises, but UK gov't says no to second vote

REUTERS
LONDON
Published 17.12.2018 00:28
Updated 17.12.2018 08:00

Britain's government is not preparing for a second referendum on Brexit, ministers said yesterday, sticking to the script that Prime Minister Theresa May's deal could still pass through parliament with a few changes.

May delayed a vote last week on her agreement to leave the European Union because she was set to lose in parliament and has tried to secure "assurances" from the bloc to try to better sell it to skeptical lawmakers. Brussels said last week it was ready to help but warned her that she could not renegotiate the deal.

With less than four months before Britain is due to leave in March, Brexit, the biggest shift in trade and foreign policy for more than 40 years, is proving anything but smooth, complicated by the deep divisions in parliament and across the country.

With May facing deadlock in parliament over the deal and the EU offering little so far, more politicians are talking about the possibility of Britain leaving without an agreement or a second referendum that could stop Brexit from happening.

Asked if the government was preparing for a vote, education minister Damian Hinds told Sky News: "No, a second referendum would be divisive. We've had the people's vote, we've had the referendum and now we've got to get on with implementing it."

May survived a no confidence vote among her Conservative lawmakers last week, but opposition parties are calling for Labor to propose a parliamentary motion of no confidence against the government this week. Labor has repeatedly said it will call such a motion at "the best time," or when it knows it can win, and for now will try to force the government to bring its deal to parliament sooner.

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