White paradise of Pamukkale a perfect offbeat summer destination

DAILY SABAH
ISTANBUL
Published 17.08.2019 00:13
Tourists flocked to Pamukkale during the eid holiday last week.
Tourists flocked to Pamukkale during the eid holiday last week.

Travertines as white as cotton, stretching out to the horizon, is what makes Pamukkale (Cotton Castle) a treat to the eye. Every year, this natural wonder is visited by hundreds of thousands of people who want to see this epic natural formation as well as heal the body and soul.

Located in the Aegean province of Denizli, the world-renowned Pamukkale is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, known for its mineral-rich thermal waters and white travertine terraces.

Lying on the crossroads of Turkey's resort towns, Pamukkale manages to draw more people during summer from all over Turkey and across the globe, particularly Europe, East Asia, Latin America and Russia.

With the ruins of the ancient city of Hierapolis nearby, Pamukkale has been known as a center for thermal health for millennia. Discovered by the Phrygians thousands of years ago, the healing waters of Pamukkale are popular among those who seek alternative medicine. The site is especially famous for its white limestone travertines, shaped by calcium-rich hot springs.

With water temperature fixed at 36 degrees Celsius regardless of the season, the healing waters of Pamukkale are believed to have healing benefits for cardiovascular diseases, rheumatism, skin and nerve diseases as well as intestinal disorders.

The Karahayit region, also known as a city of thermal cures, is the most popular destination for cure-seekers in Pamukkale. The unusually red water of the Karahayit thermal pool remains at an average of 60 degrees Celsius all year round. It wells up from beneath calcite rocks and is rich in iron. This red water is believed to help those with rheumatism, asthma, bronchitis and skin diseases.

Visitors can walk barefoot in the hot springs along the travertine terraces, which remain at comfortably warm temperatures even in the winter.

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