US does not have democracy, former presidential candidate Ron Paul says

DAILY SABAH
ISTANBUL
Published 07.06.2016 15:52
Updated 07.06.2016 15:54


The United States is not a democratic country, former presidential candidate and Rep. Ron Paul said Monday on MSNBC's "Morning Joe."

"This country, we do not really have democracy. I mean, even if we were really, really super happy with the Libertarian candidate, you think they'd get into the debates?" Paul said. "No, the debates are run by the Republicans and Democrats. They'd find a way of banning them."

Republicans and Democrats would "find a way of excluding them," Paul said, and it would not likely happen "unless you're a billionaire and can put enough pressure, and the media capitulate and say, hey, maybe we ought to talk to a third-party candidate."

"Overall, foreign policy won't change with either party in a significant manner. Spending is going to continue. Government intervention of the Federal Reserve is going to keep manipulating interest rates, and never facing up to the fact that this country has lived way beyond its means. And the debt is incomprehensible and all we know is it's going to grow and grow," said Paul. "And I think the fighting, the personal fighting is a distraction from the real issue, which is personal liberty and the bankruptcy of this country and the failure of our foreign policy."

In short, Ron Paul, who mounted an unsuccessful bid for the GOP nomination in 2012, made clear that the U.S. does not really have choices in the upcoming elections.

"I think the people are left with very poor choices and no real contrast," Paul said.

He noted particular resemblances in approaches to the executive branch between Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton and presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump.

"I think they believe in a strong executive, and that's opposite of libertarianism. The libertarian principle of nonaggression, that is where government can't use force to mold a society or the economy or tell other people how to live around the world. I would say that's a great principle," Paul said.

Paul has previously showed his general support of four third-party candidates in 2008 when he supported Cynthia McKinney of the Green Party; Bob Barr of the Libertarian Party; Chuck Baldwin of the Constitution Party; and Ralph Nader who was running as an independent candidate. He had strongly made it clear that he would not support John McCain of the Republican Party, or Barack Obama of the Democratic Party.

This time around Paul still has not changed his stance stating, "I'm not overly enthralled with the candidates, but that principle is worthwhile and the opposite of what we've been living with and opposite of the ideas that have brought us to this point where we are now facing bankruptcy, and nobody is talking about the seriousness of the economy and the bankruptcy we face."

"I think the people are left with very poor choices and no real contrast," Paul said.

"I think they believe in a strong executive, and that's opposite of libertarianism. The libertarian principle of nonaggression, that is where government can't use force to mold a society or the economy or tell other people how to live around the world. I would say that's a great principle," Paul said.

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