Unease about white supremacy grows after Portland stabbings

ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND
Published 31.05.2017 23:52

Unease about white supremacist activity in Portland deepened after the fatal stabbings of two men who tried to shield young women from an anti-Muslim tirade, and some people worry that the famously tolerant community could see a resurgence of the hostilities that once earned it the nickname "Skinhead City."

The attack aboard a light-rail train happened Friday, the first day of Ramadan, the holiest time of the year for Muslims. Authorities say Jeremy Joseph Christian started verbally abusing two young women, including one wearing a hijab. When three men on the train intervened, police say, Christian attacked them, killing two and wounding one.

Court documents released Tuesday for the first time mentioned a fourth man who was the first to intervene and was not attacked, but they did not identify him by his full name.

Christian, 35, was defiant during his brief initial court appearance Tuesday, shouting: "You call it terrorism, I call it patriotism!" He made repeated outbursts, saying, "You've got no safe place!" and "Death to the enemies of America!"

The deaths stunned the city, but also underscored nervousness about recent events, including a series of apparent hate crimes in the region and contentious public rallies that have drawn national attention.

The Pacific Northwest has a long and violent history of white supremacist and other racist activities, despite its more recent reputation for being one of the nation's most socially liberal regions.

"The idea that Portland is so liberal supersedes this dark, hidden secret about racism," said Karen Gibson, a professor of urban studies at Portland State University. Many of the early settlers to Oregon were from Southern states and brought with them negative attitudes about blacks, Gibson said. Only about 6 percent of the Portland population is black, while more than 70 percent is non-Hispanic white, statistics show.

Since Trump's election, Portland has led all major metropolitan areas in reported hate crimes, Mayor Ted Wheeler's office said.

"I don't have that feeling like it can't happen here — the way people talk about Portland — because we've got racism. We've got all kinds of things," said Murr Brewster, who came to see a memorial at the city's transit center. "It's everywhere and the trouble is, it's getting more and more prevalent."

The stabbings cap a series of unsettling events in recent months in and around Portland.

Earlier this year, organizers of a small community parade affiliated with the city's famous Rose Festival canceled the celebration over fears of violence after protesters said the local Republican Party had plans to allow a "neo-Nazi hate group" to march with them. Local GOP leaders denied the charges.

In the suburb of Troutdale, an Iranian refugee found his home painted with racist graffiti and death threats. And in Gresham, another eastern suburb, prosecutors charged a man with a hate crime after police said he chased down a black teenager with his car after a fight and struck him, killing him.

For years, Portland was the home base for Volksfront, a now-defunct white separatist organization founded in 1994, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups.

"There have been skinheads in that region forever," said Heidi Beirich, spokeswoman for the law center.

One of the most infamous attacks in Portland's racial history occurred in November 1988, when an Ethiopian immigrant was beaten to death by three white supremacists in front of his apartment.

Mulugeta Seraw was a student who came to the United States to attend college. The members of the California-based White Aryan Resistance killed him with a baseball bat.

The Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League won a multimillion-dollar civil case in 1990 against the White Aryan Resistance on behalf of his family, and the damages crippled the organization.

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