US architects bridge US-Mexico border with pop-up seesaw

DAILY SABAH
ISTANBUL
Published 30.07.2019 20:02
Members of the Mexican military police wearing the insignia of the new National Guard check children and people as they play seesaw installed between the border fence that divides Mexico from the United States in Ciudad de Juarez, Mexico (AP Photo)
Members of the Mexican military police wearing the insignia of the new National Guard check children and people as they play seesaw installed between the border fence that divides Mexico from the United States in Ciudad de Juarez, Mexico (AP Photo)

Two architects from the United States have built a pop-up seesaw on the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico to allow children from both countries to play together and raise awareness about the ongoing border and migration issues in the region.

University of California architecture professor Ronald Rael and San Jose State design associate professor Virginia San Fratello came up with the project and put the pink seesaw on the border wall between the two countries.

One of the most incredible experiences of my and @vasfsf's career bringing to life the conceptual drawings of the Teetertotter Wall from 2009 in an event filled with joy, excitement, and togetherness at the borderwall. The wall became a literal fulcrum for U.S. - Mexico relations and children and adults were connected in meaningful ways on both sides with the recognition that the actions that take place on one side have a direct consequence on the other side. Amazing thanks to everyone who made this event possible like Omar Rios @colectivo.chopeke for collaborating with us, the guys at Taller Herrería in #CiudadJuarez for their fine craftsmanship, @anateresafernandez for encouragement and support, and everyone who showed up on both sides including the beautiful families from Colonia Anapra, and @kerrydoyle2010, @kateggreen , @ersela_kripa , @stphn_mllr , @wakawaffles, Chris Gauthier and many others (you know who you are). #raelsanfratello #borderwallasarchitecture

A post shared by Ronald Rael (@rrael) on

Children on both sides of the border can play games despite being in different countries.

Ronald Rael shared a post on his Instagram account on Monday, saying that bringing to life the conceptual drawings of the Teetertotter Wall from 2009 in an event filled with joy, excitement, and togetherness at the border wall was one of the most incredible experiences of his and his colleague's career.

"The Wall became a literal fulcrum for U.S.-Mexico relations and children and adults were connected in meaningful ways on both sides with the recognition that the actions that take place on one side have a direct consequence on the other side," he wrote.

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