South Korean right-wing group protests possible Kim visit in Seoul

DAILY SABAH WITH REUTERS
ISTANBUL
Published 14.12.2018 15:04
Updated 14.12.2018 17:44
Members of a South Korean conservative civic group take part in an anti-North Korea protest in Seoul, South Korea, Dec. 8, 2018. (Reuters Photo)
Members of a South Korean conservative civic group take part in an anti-North Korea protest in Seoul, South Korea, Dec. 8, 2018. (Reuters Photo)

Demonstrators in South Korea took to the streets Friday to protest a possible visit by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to Seoul, cutting North Korean flags and burning Kim Jong Un posters.

About 100 demonstrators attended the protest organized by the far-right Korean Patriots Party.

Within the reconciliation process between two Koreans, there will be a diplomatic visit by Kim Jong Un to the South Korean capital, according to Kim administration sources, however, the date has not been specified yet.

At a recent rally in downtown Seoul, banners read "Let's punish Kim Jong Un" and organizers said they intend to try to "arrest" the North Korean leader.

"Once (Kim) steps on our land he will be captured and no one can take responsibility for what will happen afterward," Ihn Ji-yeon, a leader with the far-right Korea Patriots Party told Reuters at the rally.

Seoul police declined to comment on those claims.

At their summit in Pyongyang in September, Kim told South Korean President Moon Jae-in he would visit Seoul "at an early date." South Korean officials pressed for it to happen this year, but they now say that appears unlikely.

Any summit in Seoul would likely be overshadowed by a lack of progress on negotiations between North Korea and the United States over Pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme.

Baek Seung Joo, Liberty Korea Party chairman said earlier in a statement that if Kim is to visit Seoul then "what our government should never do is to prepare an artificial welcome by blocking anti-Kim demonstrators."

Saying that the demonstrators should express themselves freely, Baek added that these kinds of preventions limit the "freedom of expression."

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter