Military deployed for rescues in Australia floods

FRENCH PRESS AGENCY - AFP
QUEENSLAND
Published 05.02.2019 00:07 Modified 05.02.2019 00:07

Australia's military has been deployed to tackle devastating "once-in-a-century" floods that have inundated homes, schools and airports in the country's northeast, forcing hundreds to flee and bringing crocodiles onto the streets.

The Australian Defense Forces delivered 70,000 sandbags, deployed amphibious cargo vehicles and helped pluck flashlight-wielding residents from their rooftops yesterday, as monsoon rains drenched the northern state of Queensland.

Australia's tropical north typically experiences heavy rains during the monsoon season, but the recent downpour has seen some areas get a year's worth of rainfall in a week. The authorities were forced to open floodgates of a major dam late Sunday, unleashing what they called "dangerous and high velocity flows."

In hard-hit Townsville, cars were mostly submerged, with picket fences barely poking through waist-deep flood waters.

"We've never seen so much water in our lives," said local radio journalist Gabi Elgood. "You think there can't possibly be any more to come but the rain just doesn't stop."

Desperate residents had to contend not only with flash flooding, landslides and power blackouts, but also several saltwater crocodile sightings in residential roads and cul-de-sacs. Queensland Police issued a blunt warning for people to stay out of floodwaters.

"If the thought of coming face to face with a crocodile isn't deterrent enough, before you start playing in flood waters you should always remember the distinct possibility you could be wading in your neighbor's faeces," the statement said.

Emergency services have struggled to respond to the scale of the disaster, with more than 1,100 people calling for help and 18 "swift water rescues" conducted overnight.

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