Israel's expectations from Qatar plan

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Even Twitter has suspended Al Jazeera's account. Google has erased all links to the stories that Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner and Saudi King Salman's 30-year-old son Mohammed had been secretly cooking up Qatar invasion plans. It all looked like a fait accompli, "Qatar is a small country of our brothers; they have rogue leaders. We will help them get rid of them."

With one stroke of a pen, as they say, the Turkish government passed a law in Parliament to increase its military presence in Qatar and to fortify it with Air Forces. At the same time President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan started to work the phones, calling leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) as well as interested parties in Europe. Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu is running the vastest and fastest shuttle diplomacy.

By now, the young Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed and Kushner know perfectly well that nobody is going to topple the al-Thani family in Qatar let alone occupy the state.

Two other people also know now that there is no way to capitalize on the Qatari crisis to make the Palestinian issue disappear. They are Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu and Defense Minister Lieberman.

These two have been dreaming since Trump entered the White House that the Palestinian issue would be solved somehow magically and they will move their official residencies to east Jerusalem. During Trump's first 100 days, they offered lucrative business plans to the Jared Kushner's.

Jared's father is also in the real estate business, like Trump. Through Jared, Israeli politicians and religious leaders allegedly reached out to Trump and offered their own so-called peace plan, which actually was another version of free reign of housing in the occupied Arab lands. That plan has had several points like convincing the Palestinians that new Israeli housing was good for them. Allegedly, the Jordanian king and the Egyptian coup leader-turned-president had been tasked with it.

As they say all was fine and dandy except one sticking point: Hamas. As part of the Arab political movement Hamas has been Israel's most troublesome opponent. When Kushner and the deputy crown prince of Saudi Arabia got together under the watchful eyes of financier-turned-political adviser of Trump, Steve Bannon of Breitbart fame, it was easy to come up with the "final solution" to the Hamas problem. They called it the "drain the swamp" solution. It was to kill the support by Qatar to Hamas. Thus you'd be killing two birds with one stone. The Muslim Brotherhood would also be targeted because Qatar was their main supporter as well; and Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi would get rid of his major headache.

Perhaps that was why the president of the United States made his first foreign visit to Saudi Arabia, to instigate the intra-Arab rivalries that have been frothing since the al-Thanis discovered a large field of natural gas in their territorial waters. Also, such a visit would increase the credibility of the young prince Mohammed.

As they say in the Anglo-Saxon neck of the woods, man plans and God laughs. When the Qatar tile did not fall the whole domino plan stopped. So did Israeli expectations.

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