PKK terrorism at G20

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Last weekend, when terrorism dominated the agenda at the G20 Summit in Hamburg, a group of terrorists poured onto the streets of Hamburg and wreaked havoc all across the city.

As G20 leaders discussed terrorism and issued a joint statement, terrorists took control of a part of the city for four or five hours, before the eyes of the world, threatening public safety and security.

As terror tore through several districts, Turkey and President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan's delegation at the summit can empathize with Hamburg and its people, probably in the best way possible. We have also witnessed such militancy and vandalism on a few occasions, during the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul and the violence in Sur, Diyarbakır.

As the Turkish proverb goes, an ember burns where it falls. This time it burned Hamburg. The citizens of Turkey can grasp Hamburgers' rightful anger, and so can the Turkish police for their German counterparts.

In Hamburg, 476 police were injured, some severely. Terrorism, which ravaged a number of neighborhoods in the city, showed its dangerous face to the world yet again.

The police tried to enable security with more than 20,000 officers but were not able to manage this since international counterterrorism units do not have a chance to overcome the threats on the national level. Various terrorist groups are experienced in cooperating when they find it necessary.

The majority of militants terrorizing Hamburg's streets did not speak any German, and although they did not speak the same language, their target was the same – the police. No matter which nation's uniform they wear, police officers were violently assaulted again.

More importantly, there is no difference between terrorists who throw Molotov cocktails or shoot guns. They all aim to kill people.

Turkey turned out to be right once more as the Hamburg incidents escalated. The PKK was quite active in Hamburg throughout the G20 Summit. Its militants joined and supported the masked vandals that set fire to the city.

Erdoğan had repeatedly warned EU countries, including Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium, that terrorism would sneak up on them if they abet terrorist groups, and now here is the Hamburg case.

Turkey is familiar with the urban guerrilla tactics employed in Hamburg from the days when the PKK set fire to the streets of Diyarbakır. Those who seized control in Hamburg also employed similar tactics to the PKK, ultimately revealing the role it played in the incident.

I truly wonder when the EU is going to wake up to the truth and the EU public realize the facts and press their governments on the issue.

PKK militants use the countries they take asylum in as operation centers. The EU-based police departments know very well that the PKK racket manipulates many Kurdish people, especially businessmen, living in the region.

The terrorist group also plays an active role in drug and human trafficking across Europe. EU countries advertently and inadvertently offer significant monetary and human source to the PKK. While by deceiving numerous Kurdish youth and training them in Iraq and Syria for the terrorist group, the PKK makes life miserable for Kurds living in Europe.

Despite this, the PKK was also a major participant in the legal demonstrations against the G20, held on the second day of the summit.

Acting with vandals to terrorize the streets the previous day, the PKK was this time on the streets with those who had legal permits to protest. Just a week after German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel said that it was unacceptable to allow PKK propaganda, the terrorist group marched in the streets of Hamburg.

The PKK is listed as a terrorist group by Germany, where it is also forbidden to carry PKK flags or photos of its imprisoned leader, Abdullah Öcalan. But sadly, police officers in Hamburg were forced to witness the transgression of this ban. I have little doubt that the German police would apply the rules perfectly had they not be restricted. But seemingly, the police do not have any other choice, and with this mindset, the battle against terrorism can never succeed.

The statements against -terrorism at the summit have no significance or credibility if PKK militants can continue their terrorist propaganda on the streets. Since the PKK terrorized Hamburg during the G20, the summit turned into a complete fiasco.

In the Netherlands and Austria, Turkish ministers have been prohibited from attending rallies organized by Turks there to stand up for democracy and protest the July 15 coup attempt. If the PKK's propaganda is condoned but Turkish ministers are banned, counterterrorism efforts have close to no chance of success. And terrorists ravaging Hamburg might do the same in other European cities, only because of such wrong political decisions and practices.

Once again, I wonder when the EU will wake up from its deep sleep and notice that the terrorists they abet actually pose a danger to Turkey and more importantly to themselves. Hopefully, terrorism will not sneak up on them while they are asleep.

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