Turkey’s Baykar delivers more drones to Ukraine

DAILY SABAH
Published 22.10.2019 11:45
Bayraktar TB2 drone being tested at the Starokostiantyniv Air Base, Khmelnytskyi province, western Ukraine, Oct. 21, 2019. (Ukrainian Air Force via AA)
Bayraktar TB2 drone being tested at the Starokostiantyniv Air Base, Khmelnytskyi province, western Ukraine, Oct. 21, 2019. (Ukrainian Air Force via AA)

Leading unmanned aerial platform developer Baykar on Monday delivered another batch of Bayraktar TB2 drones to Ukraine.

Three aircraft, ammunition, a simulator, camera systems and ground data terminals were delivered to the Ukrainian Air Force.

The newly delivered drones are being tested at the Starokostiantyniv Air Base in western Ukraine.

"During the tests, the combat capabilities of the aircraft, maximum altitude, orbital flight, landing, and main and emergency power systems were tested," Ukraine's Defense Ministry said Tuesday.

Last month, Ukrainian Air Force personnel completed training to operate the drones. At the initial stage of use, they will be assisted by Turkish experts. Ukraine successfully tested the first TB2 drones in March.

Looking to boost its defensive capabilities in the wake of Russian aggression, Ukraine announced the agreement to purchase 12 TB2 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in January.

The Bayraktar TB2 armed drones, produced by Baykar and operationally used since 2015, have continued to support the fight against terror in other regions while providing effective surveillance, reconnaissance and fire support to Turkish security forces in Operations Euphrates and Olive Branch. Bayraktar TB2 UAVs have played an active role in detecting, diagnosing and neutralizing thousands of terrorists to date.

Performing active reconnaissance, surveillance and intelligence flights, the Bayraktar TB2 has the ability to transmit images to operation centers without delay and engage targets.

It boasts a service ceiling of 8,239 meters (27,030 feet) and a flight endurance of 24 hours. It can carry 150 kilograms (330 pounds) of payload and can be operated day and night.

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