Hieroglyphics discovered in central Turkey describe achievements of Hittite king

DAILY SABAH
ISTANBUL
Published
3,250-year-old hieroglyphics describe achievements of Hittite King in Konya, Turkey (AA Photo)
3,250-year-old hieroglyphics describe achievements of Hittite King in Konya, Turkey (AA Photo)

Hieroglyphics deciphered at a 3,250-year-old Yalburt Hittite Pool in Konya, central Turkey, describe the triumphs and achievements of Hittite King Tudhaliya IV.

Yalburt Water Monument, measuring 13 by 8 meters, includes 20 stone blocks detailing the actions of Tudhaliya IV, who reigned from 1237-1209 B.C.

The hieroglyphics recount a military campaign made to southwest Anatolia, Selçuk University Professor Hasan Bahar told Anadolu Agency.

"Here [Tudhaliya IV] talks of the cities he saw," said Bahar, describing the hieroglyphics. "It looks like at the pool he was giving an account to the people."

Hittite society was not democratic, but the actions of the king to his people show an orderly society, Bahar said.

The pool was first unearthed in 1970 during work on the Ilgın district's water system.

Bahar added that the Hittites are just one of many civilizations Konya has hosted.

Vistors to Konya often visit its other Hittite sites as well, including the Eflatunpınar, Fasıllar, Kurunta monuments.

Historians believe Tudhaliya IV was a king of the Hittite Empire, which was centered in Anatolia but reached parts of northern Levant and Upper Mesotamia. To cope with a severe drought, he built 13 dams, one of which survives to this day at Alacahöyük, in Turkey's Çorum Province. Tudhaliya IV was defeated in battle in 1230 B.C. by Tukulti-Ninurta I of Assyria.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter