Museum displays 216 instruments from shaman drum to bağlama

ANADOLU AGENCY
ESKİŞEHİR, Turkey
Published
The museum displays 216 musical instruments including items such as the Kazakh qobuz and Kyrgyz kyl kiyak.
The museum displays 216 musical instruments including items such as the Kazakh qobuz and Kyrgyz kyl kiyak.

Located in the Turkish World Science Culture and Art Center at Anadolu University (AU), Music History Hall museum boasts an exhibition of 216 Turkish-Islamic historical instruments, providing a unique music experience for visitors.

Open six days a week, the museum sits on 80,000 square meters located in the Sazova neighborhood. Made or supplied by artist Feridun Obul and renowned Turkish musician, Associate Professor Rahmi Oruç Güvenç who passed away last year, the 216 musical instruments on display include unusual items, like a shaman drum and a type of bagpipe called a tulum.

While visitors look at the instruments, they can also listen to them being played through headsets. For a more hands-on experience, visitors can interact with 50 instruments in the "Experience Room." The museum also offers visitors the opportunity to listen to concerts highlighting Turkish-Islamic civilization.

Biggest instrument museum in Turkey

Director of AU Turkish World Science Culture and Art Center Associate Professor Mehmet Topal told Anadolu Agency (AA) that Music History Hall is one of the most important places in the center. Implying that they will increase the number of instruments on display soon, he reported that around 400 instruments have been used throughout Turkish-Islamic history.

"We have arranged the instruments chronologically. We offer a tour that starts with the shaman drum and continues all the way up to modern instruments. Our visitors have the opportunity to see many familiar instruments and some more unusual pieces, like the shaman drum. Some of our displays are more like timelines or historical journeys that start from the first undeveloped versions of an instrument to the more modern models. While visitors look at the instruments, they can also listen to them through a special system. For example, someone who is curious about an Afghan rubab can listen to it through headphones. We are the biggest instrument museum in Turkey. The number of the instruments will increase, as well. When people visit the museum, they are astounded. People who are interested in music can find a diverse selection here."

Noting conservatory students can experience instruments they have never seen before there, Topal added that visitors can listen to concerts given in the museum.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter